all shook up

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Wednesday September 19th 2018

 

Today gale force winds are hitting north western areas of Britain and we have the tail end here in the West Midlands. Isis frisks around joyfully in her garden. She’s been out there for almost two hours.

I check on her again from the back window, then glance out of the front door.

The hazel and the overgrown buddleia look as though they’re frantically waving for help and an abandoned plastic food container is bowling along the main road.

Time to fetch her. She loves the wildness of the wind, but, as usual, unless something has upset her, she is very good about coming in, and, after the usual little taps, she trots towards the house in front of me and pops inside.

For weeks now I’ve noted that her bed needs a wash. Its lovely fleecy white lining is pale brown with muddy paw marks and it doesn’t smell very fragrant either.

O.K. today’s the day.

I remove the inner pillow. Noting that the memory foam chips it contains are crumbly and likely to spill out, I carefully place it on a chair high up on top of a pile of boxes, well out of Hairy One’s reach.

I stuff the bed into the washing machine.

It’s turning out to be a week of sorting dog affairs, I reflect with a deep sigh. All her dog towels are drying in the bathroom but there’s nowhere to put them as their container is bursting with plastic bags and old sheets (useful for protecting the rug when Isis is damp and muddy).

Must be the main reason for avoiding housework: whatever you do has a knock-on effect.

Rashly, I empty the container onto the kitchen floor. Oh horror!

 

 

 

 

 

At this point, Isis emerges into the hall. She looks different, somehow. She has little bits of foam in her hair  …….

Oh.

I shoot into the back room. The ‘out of her reach’ pillow, of course,  is no longer on the chair.

Silly me.

 

 

 

 

“Oh, Isis! Thanks a million for your help”, I murmur.

But she merely lies by the front door looking miffed.

 

 

 

 

What has Human done with her bed?

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

Posted in deaf/blind dog plays, Isis at home | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

y-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-wn

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Sunday September 16th 2018

 

Lucky today. Ji. is just finishing cutting back the brambles, teasels and unidentified shrub which I planted in the front garden years ago, having mistaken it as a cutting for an ornamental orange blossom.

Isis is dancing and playing with a ball in the back garden where she’s been for at least two hours.

While Hairy One cavorts in the garden, Daisy has some quality time downstairs contentedly sitting on my lap.

And all this before the rain begins.

Excellent.

It’s pleasant to sit in the front room with plenty of light and minus the shrub’s maniacal fingers drumming on the glass.

Only one fly in the ointment, and it’s a whopping, hairy, white bluebottle of a fly too: I’ve had to recommence dog’s dining room training.

My (very bored) long-term blog readers may recall that after months and months of work, Isis was finally able to eat without caterwauling, screeching, barking, snapping and leaping at imaginary marauders whom she was convinced were hellbent on snatching her meal.

For a couple of years, quiet reigned in the dining room. B blips were rare.

Unfortunately, after Isis was left at Ray’s Hollytrees kennels for three weeks while I was ill last Autumn, she resumed her bad habit.

After more weeks of effort, her rages subsided considerably, but did not completely stop.

I should have known better, having been an inner city secondary school teacher for thirteen years, and having looked after cats and dogs for even longer. Unless unwanted behaviour is eradicated, it will resurface.

I blush to think about the pompous and smug post I wrote on July 18th this year. Embarrassingly, I ended it with

“You’ve come a long way, little Isis”, I tell her. “We can put up with a bark or two.”

Unfortunately, the bark or two escalated, and while friend A. looked after Isis and Daisy when I was away in August, she reported that there was not one quiet mealtime.

Regressed dog. Stupid Human.

We must begin again.

Sigh.

So we resume our training. Again, as soon as she emits a bark, I remove her food. Without exception. At least this time round she only requires one removal per meal. She protests noisily, of course. Once she is calm and quiet again, the dish is returned and she eats without any vocals.

So far, she has had her meal removed every breakfast time, but her manners have been perfect at teatime. Strange. Never mind, it’s progress.

Yesterday she managed to eat both meals without interruption.

Dog, it’s wearing. But I can never get away with ‘can’t be bothered’ where Isis is concerned. She is the living  epitome of the expression ‘Give an inch and he’ll take an ell.’

Hmmmm. You’d not believe this to look at her.

Here she is, at this very moment, the subject of this monologue, sleeping angelically. Like most dogs and cats, she always makes a beeline for my place on the day bed. It’s not possible, I think, for her to squirm herself any further into my end.

Note her unoccupied dog blanket in the background.

 

 

 

 

 

Oh. It’s six p.m. Let’s see what happens. There’s sardine with her biscuits tonight. She’ll definitely be tempted to defend that.

I serve her meal and exit the kitchen.

I wait.

Eventually, there’s a subdued ‘woof, woof.’

I hurry into the kitchen.

No, all is well. She’s just announcing that she’s finished. She’s standing by her licked clean dish looking content.

Excellent.

Just breakfast to conquer, then – as long as I don’t leave her in the kennels again.

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

Posted in food rage, Isis and Daisy, Isis at home, Isis is no angel | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

a silly dog day

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Wednesday September 12th 2018

 

After Sunday’s challenging exit from Kings Heath Park, Isis walks home like the perfect dog.

It soon transpires, though, that this display of canine perfection is only put on to lull me into a false sense of security. In reality, she has decided that it’s silly dog day.

My latest compromise with her over bad behaviour in her dining room isn’t working.

I give her her tea – biscuits and a raw egg – and retreat up the hall to let her eat in peace.

Peace? I delude myself. She waits until I disappear into the front room, begins to eat, counts twenty and barks loudly. She then gobbles down as much food as she can before I return and remove her tea.

She is not pleased.

The following is an unusually brief example of her outrage. Perhaps she doesn’t wish to show herself up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

After fifteen minutes, I return her dish and she munches angelically until she has finished.

We have a reasonably peaceful evening and I let her out for her last garden visit of the day.

Unfortunately, while she is out, there’s a sudden deluge so that when she returns her paws are covered in churned up mud.

She makes an escape bid and shoots into her bed; but wicked Human follows with a towel and begins GENTLY cleaning her filthy little feet.

As I tackle her front paws, she begins to grumble. I tap her on her back with two reprimanding fingers. But when I tackle her back feet, all hell breaks loose. She twirls and snaps viciously at her feet.

Sometimes when she has these outbursts, I can stop her by standing so close that she doesn’t have room to whirl. But not today. She whizzes around so fast that she bangs herself against my legs and a nearby chair, teeth firmly gripping one back foot.

In desperation, I push my good arm through the middle of the spinning, white, hairy doughnut and lift it up.

I want to stop her biting herself and my options are limited.

Not a good idea. On previous occasions, for example, when she has been trapped in a nightmare and I’ve unable to get through to her, holding her has eventually calmed her down.

But not tonight. She continues to spin in my arms like a furry catherine wheel. I return her to her bed where she completes a few more spins before sitting down for a growly snap or two.

I’ve no idea what has set her off. She doesn’t like her legs being washed or dried, of course, but it’s a very long time since she’s freaked out like this.

Usually her bedtime treats are already ‘hidden’ for her to find when she comes in from the garden but Human has been slow off the mark tonight and hasn’t done them yet.

No, that can’t be it. She’s not responded like this before.

I leave her to calm down.

When I return about thirty minutes later, she’s on the day bed. I distribute the treats around the room as usual.

She shows not the slightest interest.

I put a treat under her nose. She turns her head away. She doesn’t even bother to give it a sniff.

Next morning the two gravy bones left on her pillow have gone but all the other treats are still where I left them.

But when I put my hand by her nose to announce my arrival, she wags her tail happily and accepts hugs and kisses.

Obviously today is another day.

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

Posted in a very naughty dog, food rage, Isis at home, Kings Heath Park, self-damaging, self-harming, strange behaviour, twirling | Tagged , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

rebel without a cause?

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Sunday September 9th 2018

 

Two lovely, damp, gloomy weekend days, with light showers on Saturday. Lovely Isis weather. So on both days we walk to the park.

Isis, somewhat deprived as she’s been, of street smells, proceeds very slowly and is soon only capable of gestural pees.

It takes us thirty five minutes to reach the park. I estimate that we’ll take about twenty five minutes on our return journey and decide that with walking both ways, Isis should be well exercised if she has about thirty five minutes off lead to play.

She runs around gleefully, after which I re-harness her as usual and off we set. Or, to be more accurate, off I set. I am immediately brought up short. Isis is sitting down with a distinctly uncooperative expression on her face.

Oh. This is very unusual. Refusing to walk to the park yes. Refusing to walk in the direction I’ve chosen, yes, but refusing to leave the park?

I allow her to choose which way to go. She makes it crystal (as our politicians appear impelled to say) clear that she doesn’t wish to move in any direction, thank you.

And she won’t.

I sign ‘walk on’. I pat her encouragingly. I stand still and wait. And wait. And wait. I examine her feet to see if there’s anything sticking in her pad or between her toes. Nothing. I feel her carefully all over. Nothing. I give gentle, then less gentle tugs on her lead.

Finally, I stride on, bearing her weight on the running belt around my waist.

She protests by digging her heels firmly into the ground.

I imagine the headlines in Dogs’ Daily: cruel human seen dragging innocent dog across Kings Heath Park………………further enquiries reveal that this poor little dog is not only much smaller than her aggressor, but is also deaf and blind ……….

We eventually leave the park. Isis twice sits down on the pavement, but then gives up and walks calmly home.

I am still concerned that I may have missed something, but a further careful examination reveals no obvious reason for her behaviour.

And, judging by the way she leaps ecstatically in the muddy garden later in the evening, there is no obvious reason.

Today, she walks eagerly to the park again. No hesitation at all.

I can only conclude that she wished to stay in the park yesterday, that thirty-five minutes didn’t feel enough time.

I am free this evening, so she can play off lead for her usual hour.

After she has run around joyfully for her hour, I walk carefully into the big shrubbery and tap her back. As usual, she makes her way out and stands still so that I can put her back into her harness.

Yes, she looks ready to go …………………………

 

 

 

 

…… sort of.

 

 

Oh.

I wait for a minute or too.

Perhaps she needs a rest.

 

 

 

Or not.

 

Dogs’ Daily, Sunday Edition: Once again, it has been reported that ………………

 

At least today the little  *^@  has the grace to walk properly once we approach the park gate.

Isis, Isis.

What more can I say?

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

 

Posted in a very naughty dog, deaf/blind dog plays, I'm off my lead!, Kings Heath Park, running running, strange behaviour, walking in the park, walking my deaf/blind dog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

where’s the car?

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Wednesday September 5th 2018

 

Thank you for all the lovely comments made on Hairy One’s gotcha day post, and apologies to Isabel whom I forgot was the volunteer who went to collect Isis.

I am very grateful for the dry weather which makes it possible for Isis to play in the garden. Although we have managed to walk to Kings Heath Park three times over the last ten days, it’s not been easy to persuade her that yes, it’s definitely what she most wants to do.

Even though we only attempt the walk on damp, cloudy days, on one of these  three outings she spends  almost all of her off the lead time sitting morosely under the fir tree in her favourite Colour Garden shrubbery.

Perhaps the light isn’t quite right.

On a bright day, of course, I’ve no chance of persuading her to move  more than a few yards from the  gate.

But even when it’s sunny, she’ll allow herself to be nudged out onto the pavement so that she can walk smartly to the space where the car used to be parked.

Once there, she sniffs around where the car doors should be and looks depressed. Then she tugs me urgently back towards the gate.

She loves going in the car. Poor Isis. Where has that car gone?

To the car’s graveyard, I’m afraid. I kept it running by filling up the coolant tank every other day – or every day if we we ventured further than a couple of miles away.

I managed to persuade it to take us to the R.S.P.C.A. for Hairy One’s anal glands to be dealt with and to collect two month’s supply of Daisy’s thyroid tablets, two days before my shoulder operation. But its head gasket was on its way out and would have cost £6oo.00 to replace as the engine would have had to be stripped down.

The car was over nineteen years old and, unsurprisingly, was becoming tired of life. The starter motor also needed replacing: the spring which returns the key to a neutral position had broken and unless I remembered to return the key manually, on starting, the engine emitted a ear piercing screech which could be heard well down the road. The sunroof was on its last legs and one of the windows wasn’t working. Its worst rust patch was kept in place with duct tape.

I’m hoping to replace it with a small vehicle not quite so old, as soon as I am able to drive again.

C. , the garage owner, asks me if there are any colours I really couldn’t stand. Not pink or purple, I tell him. And most certainly not lavender. I may be old, but I don’t want to look like the opening scene of ‘Miss Marple’s Last Case.’

Isis will not get into a car which she doesn’t know, unless I’m already sitting in it. If I’m on my own when she’s introduced to her little Hyundai i10, I’ll have to fill it with stuff which smells of us.

Then off we’ll go to Highbury again!

 

 

 

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

 

 

Posted in Isis and Daisy, strange behaviour, we don't like the dark | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

HAPPY GOTCHA DAY MY ISIS

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Sunday September 2nd 2018

 

Isis’s gotcha day is August 27th 2014.

Below is a photo of her taken when she arrived at Aeza cat and dog rescue in Aljezur, Portugal, in June 2014.

 

 

 

She had been found wandering down the main road of a village, trailing rope and chain behind her. The man who found her was unable to take her to Aeza himself so tied her up outside an old church and rang Aeza.

Volunteer Isabel picked her up and took her to the rescue.

She was safe.

By the time I saw her, of course, she was considerably cleaner, better fed and less waif-like than in the photo. Goodness knows what her weight was when she was found, as she was still only just nine kilos when she was first weighed here. Up to fifteen kilos is her ideal weight.

Below is a copy of the post I wrote about her gotcha day.

 

Isis Cometh

Isis comes today. Gulp.

The courier phones. Isis will be the last dog delivered. She’ll be here this evening.

Keeping busy.

Might she trip over this?

Could she fall into that?

Might this stick into her?

She’ll be here in a few hours

Last few garden hazards dealt with.

She’ll be here in 30 minutes.

I feel sick with anticipation. I am sick with anticipation – several times.

I see (the) Europet van park opposite the house. I stagger across the road with Isis’s new blue spotty collar.

Isis is carried across the road by one of the gentle couriers. The other one hands me a passport and vaccination papers.

Isis is here.

She looks terrified. Stupidly, I pick her up and place her next to me  on the futon. She begins to tremble violently. I carry her into the garden.

She explores the garden until the light is almost gone. Then she falls asleep.

I carry her into the kitchen.

 

*******

 

Isis, if I had known then what I know now, Kerry might have received a very strangely shaped and very angry parcel at Aeza Rescue a few days later!

 

 

 

I jest, of course.

 

 

 

Isis. Taken today.

 

 

 

The naughty little creature is much loved.

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

 

 

 

Sunday September 2nd 2018

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

 

 

 

Posted in adopted dogs, deaf/blind dog arrives in new home, dear little Isis, dogs adopted via DogwatchUK, Isis at home | Tagged , , , | 10 Comments

it gets worse …..

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Thursday (should have been Wednesday) August 29th 2018

 

Isis: It should have been bloody Tuesday.

Human: Isis!

Isis: Well, I ask you. Tuesday was supposed to be my big day.

Human: Yes, I know, but ……

Isis: But nothing. It was my GOTCHA day.

Human: Yes, I know. I’m sorry but ……

Isis: Yes, you made a mistake. You thought my gotcha day was August 29th.

Human: Yes, I know, I’m sorry but ……

Isis: Yes, you didn’t check because you knew you were right.

Human: Yes, I know. I’m very sorry Isis.

Isis: And as if that wasn’t bad enough, you didn’t even celebrate my Very Important Day on the wrong day. You didn’t even celebrate it two days late, on the 29th.

Human: Have a heart, Isis. I was ill.

Isis: That was your fault. You were doing drugs. Daisy told me. You know they made you ill before.

Human: They were pain killers, Isis.

Isis: Daisy told me you were doing drugs.

Human: Cats get things wrong sometimes.

Isis: No they don’t. Cats know everything. Daisy told me.

She’s cross with you as well. Why did you do them?

Human: My shoulder hurt.

Isis: Was it bad?

Human: Very bad.

Isis: Was it as bad as when I got sticks stuck in my mouth?

Human: It hurt more than when you got sticks stuck in your mouth.

Isis: All right then. But Daisy’s cross with you for forgetting my Gotcha day. That’s why she pooed on the floor while you were being sick.

Human: I don’t think so. It was just malice.

Isis: Who’s Alice.

Human: Never mind. It doesn’t matter. On Sunday our blog will be all about you. I’ll say what a sweet, clever little dog you are and I’ll take a lovely photo of you looking beautiful.

Isis: (somewhat mollified): Oh. All right then.

Human: And before I take the photo, I’ll brush you and comb you so you’ll look really stunning.

Isis: €ζø*!   !℘!

Human: Isis!

 

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

 

Posted in adopted dogs, Isis and Daisy, Isis at home | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

a very boring day in the life of Isis Podengo

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Sunday August 26th 2018

 

It’s Friday.

At 11.50 I open the back door and Isis flies out. Her dash turns into a crazy ‘released dog’ dance, not just a twirl or a leap, more like a highland fling.

Then she finds Snake, and, after mouthing a ‘Hello’ greeting or two, picks him up and trots round the garden.

 

 

 

12.05 She’s standing under the hazel tree, tail drawing cheerful circles in the air.

As I walk towards her, she jumps out and, head held high, completes what looks like a victory circuit before having an energetic trot round the garden.

12.20 She’s still trotting round the garden with snake. Sigh. This isn’t a very stimulating activity.

 

 

 

1.40 O.K. What’s Hairy doing now? Hmmm. Still under the hazel with Snake. She sashays out as I approach and comes up to greet me, tail wagging happy greetings. Then she retreats beneath her tree, shuffling well into the shadows as far as she can go.

 

 

 

I think she’s saying, “It was good to smell you, but I definitely don’t wish to come in yet, thank you.”

3.00 She’s  emerging again from the foliage around the tree. She still has her snake in her mouth. Her day seems very boring to a mere human.

 

 

 

I select a squishy ball and a rope tugger from her toy basket and take them down the garden

3.15  I wonder if she’d like a piece of cheese.

I cut her a small square and take it to her. Like most dogs she loves cheese.

I hold it out to her and she sniffs it.

I know she’d love to shoot out a pink tongue and lasso it, but there’s no way she’s going to let go of her snake.

4.45 The cheese has disappeared and she’s now holding the ball. Big deal.

 

 

 

6.45 I prepare her dinner and go to fetch her in. She’s still under her hazel tree.

Yawn.

At least she standing up this time – and she’s now holding the tugger.

 

 

 

I tap her under the chin and walk her in.

Another long day in the back garden.

She seems perfectly contented, but I feel sorry for her. She’s getting nowhere near the exercise or stimulation she needs.

I must take her out, for a road walk at least, so that she can enjoy some fresh scents.

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

got images try to collect more e.g. Isis in garden without toys

Posted in Isis and the snake, Isis at home | Tagged , | 4 Comments

my ♥ little ♥ Isis

 

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Wednesday August 21st 2018

 

Yes, I really am writing about the same dog.

Isis, bless her grubby little cotton socks, has been amazing these past two weeks.

Her last walk was three weeks ago today but she has been contented to spend time in the garden with balls or snakes. She seems happy to come inside in the evening when I fetch her, and snoozes, quietly for the most part, after her dinner.

She has been very good at night, except when I’ve fallen asleep with her on the day bed and not woken until three or four in the morning: she’s fine with the bed sharing but not happy when I go to bed upstairs the following night!

Once or twice she’s become very excited and waggy when I’ve opened the front door. She’s anticipated a walk, but has been completely accepting when I’ve closed it again and she knows she’s not getting one.

She relinquishes my place on the day bed when I ‘ask’ for it, with not so much as a sotto voce growl, let alone the hysterical rage which used to ensue from such a request.

My shoulder has been much less painful yesterday and today and I’m planning to take her on a road walk tomorrow to give her something more interesting to sniff.

Thank you for being so good, little podengo.

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

Posted in dear little Isis, Isis and the snake, Isis at home, relationship building, sleeping, sleeping arrangements | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

wasps and hoses

 

 

Posting days: Sunday and Wednesday and, sometimes, maybe, extra bits in between.

 

Sunday August 19th 2018

 

Since I’ve had the second shoulder operation I’ve not, of course, been able to take Isis for a walk. I’ve not yet felt strong enough to take her out into the lane at the bottom of the garden either, so she’s having to make do with the garden.

She spends hours happily playing in the garden, dancing, hunting in the extensive undergrowth for old toys, tracking whoever has visited since the day before and tossing around whatever she’s found to play with.

I often wonder how long she would stay out if I didn’t fetch her in.

When I pop next door, it’s safe to leave her outside for a few minutes. My neighbours are away for a week and I am doing  daily drips, leaks and floods patrols.

The first few days are uneventful. No drips, leaks or floods, just a few dead wasps on the windowsill of E’s bedroom.

Sad. I’m very fond of wasps.

Then, one day, there are ten wasps dead on the windowsill and one still flying around but struggling. I pick him up and let him fly out of the window, collect the corpses and put them in a plant pot outside.

The following day there are several little black and yellow striped jerseys with dangly legs and droopy wings, dazed but alive, and many more who lie on the window sill on their backs, wings stiff and legs rigid.

As I let the survivors out of the window, I look over into my garden to check on Isis.

Eeeeeek!

There she is with my smart blue hose pipe between her clenched teeth, all four legs seriously braced for tugging.

Jerk! Jerk! Jerk!

She heaves at the pipe which is firmly wedged in the undergrowth, brambles and teasels.

JERK! JERK! JERK!

She scrambles backwards, increasing her purchase, then stiffens her legs again and drops her rear end close to the ground.

CHOMP! CHOMP! CHOMP!

She reorganises her teeth for better grip.

H – E – A – V – E

Oh My Dog!

I close the window and hobble off down the stairs as fast as I can safely go.

Once in the garden, I tap her head gently and, thankfully, she lets go of the hose pipe. She’d not let go if it was a toy so I assume that she knows it’s not hers. Or perhaps she smells the waves of frantic human I’m giving off.

I’m lucky, there are rows of little tooth marks but no breaks.

When I tell Polymath, she says, “Oh, dear little thing. She’d love a big snake like that. You must get her one.”

I wonder if anyone sells hose piping by the metre. Must check it out.

By the way, Isis stayed out in the garden for seven hours today before coming in and pointing out that it was dog’s tea time.

 

 

 

Isis came from the Aeza cat and dog rescue and adoption centre in Aljezur, Portugal. For information about adopting an animal from the centre, contact kerry@aeza.org or  www.dogwatchuk.co.uk

 

Posted in deaf/blind dog plays, dear little Isis, Isis at home, scenting | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments